May 2010 Archives

Delmonico steak and garlic mashed potatoes

delmonico.jpgNot much of a recipe here:

I seasoned a local, natural, Greenfield Highland Beef Delmonico steak. Seared on the grill for 2 minutes on one side and 1 minute on the other. Quick chilled. Vacuum sealed. Sous vide at 133°F for 1 hour.

The sous vide technique is incredibly forgiving. I probably could have cooked the steak anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours with no noticeable difference. And the steak comes out perfectly cooked every single time.

The garlic mashed potatoes were previously frozen and vacuum sealed. Since the sous vide was occupied with the steak, I reheated the mashed potatoes by simmering the frozen bag of potatoes for 20 minutes, which produces nearly perfect mashed potatoes.

The first course was a Caesar salad.



Buttermilk

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While I did use some of the buttermilk making potato salad and cornbread, I still had nearly 24 ounces left. This happens every time I buy buttermilk so this time I decided to freeze the leftovers.

A little research on the net indicates that it should work, though probably for cooking and not drinking. But what I want to know is who drinks buttermilk?

You can put it in containers but I vacuum sealed it in bags which is more space-efficient in my freezer. We'll see how it works.

Update: It works great! Also other uses for buttermilk include fried chicken and buttermilk biscuits. Those are the same biscuits I use for sausage, egg and cheese biscuit breakfast sandwiches.




Barbecued Pork

pork1.jpgThis is my faux barbecued pork with homemade potato salad and jalapeño corn bread dinner.

It's not really barbecued pork but I wasn't sure what to call it. It was very moist and tender, but not falling apart like pulled pork. Very tasty, and an interesting experiment in time, temperature, and methods, however.

Small pork shoulder (1.8 lbs.)

Trim some of the excess fat, season with dry rub then vacuum seal.

pork2.jpgSous vide for 8 hours at 140°F. Remove from the vacuum bag then roast in the oven for 45 minutes at 250°F.

pork3.jpg


Jalapeño cornbread

cornbread1.jpgThe addition of the jalapenos was a definite improvement over the standard skillet cornbread that I made previously.

The recipe was mostly unchanged from this recipe. The main change was halving the amount of sugar.

7.1 oz. cornmeal (1 1/2 c.)
2.4 oz. all-purpose flour (1/2 c.)
1.5 oz. granulated sugar (3 tbsp.)
2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda

2 eggs
1 c. buttermilk
1/8 c. canola oil (+ additional to grease the pan)

2 jalapeno peppers, stemmed and finely diced, with ribs and seeds

Preheat the oven to 400°F with an oven-safe sauté pan.

Combine the dry ingredients.

In a separate bowl, beat the eggs, combine with the buttermilk, then the oil. Add to the dry ingredients and jalapeños and mix until everything is combined.

Add oil to the hot sauté pan you preheated and swirl around the pan until evenly coated. Add the batter, return to the oven, and bake for 18 minutes.

When done, you should just be able to slide the whole cornbread right out of the sauté pan onto a cooling rack without flipping it.

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Makes 8 slices.

Update: I added nutrition facts from caloriecount.about.com. While it's really tasty with the vegetarian chili, it certainly would be a better diet meal without the cornbread. Or maybe a half slice, as each slice is 208 calories. Also, this is from when the recipe used to have 1/4 cup of oil, so it's lower in fat and calories now.

cornbread_nf.jpgUpdate (7/6/2011):

I used two jalapeños, only stemmed and minced (I used the seeds and ribs in the bread).
I also mixed half of the oil into the batter and used half of it to grease the pan. This seemed to work better. I also reduced the cooking time to 18 minutes.

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Update 8/24/2012: Actually updated the recipe, to reduce confusion.




Potato salad

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This really is an excellent recipe for potato salad from Ina Garten. The comments and ratings on the original recipe were quite correct.

The method of cooking the potatoes works perfectly and the dressing has a great flavor.

I made a 1/3 recipe which would be a good quantity for serving two people, but it's so good that if you're making it for a group I'd go with the original recipe quantities.

Reduced recipe quantities (serves 2):

1 lb. small potatoes
1/3 c. mayonaise
1/8 c. buttermilk
1 tbsp. Dijon mustard
1 tbsp. whole-grain mustard
1/8 c. fresh dill, finely chopped
1/4 c. celery, chopped
1/4 c. red onion, chopped

I didn't use all of the dressing, but it would probably have been fine to use it all.

I'm not a huge fan of dill, but it really does work well in this recipe. Don't be afraid of it.




Sauza Hornitos Margarita

margarita.jpg
Happy cinco de mayo everyone!

In my opinion, Sauza hornitos reposado tequila makes the best tasting margarita, at least of any tequila that I can afford to put in a margarita.

Tequila, lime juice and a little simple syrup. Shake with ice. Serve on the rocks in a glass with a salted rim.

The lime juice is organic 100 % lime juice which is much better than Rose's lime juice (yuck). I would have squeezed fresh limes, and garnished with lime, except I didn't have any.

The simple syrup is just sugar and water (50 % by weight) heated to dissolve then chilled. Unlike pastry simple syrup, it's not reduced 50 %. I always keep some in the refrigerator for drinks like this.


New rule: canned fish product should be fully preserved

anchovies.jpgOK, what does "semi-preserved" mean and, really, shouldn't a canned fish product be fully preserved?

I think I know the answer because I got out a tin of anchovies for a Caesar salad. There were two tins, one was the old one of unknown vintage that I recently uncovered in my pantry cabinet (where did that come from?), and the other was a brand new tin.

I presume I opened the old tin, and it really looked more like cat food than anchovies. I ate a bit of one; should I fail to post in the future I may have died. Tell the CDC it was probably the anchovies.