Chicken roasted, barbecued and soup

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I like to buy a whole chicken and use that as a starting point for several meals. I got a 5.11 lb. natural (no hormone, no antibiotic, vegetarian feed) whole chicken. It's a little expensive at $ 12.62, but it makes a lot of meals!

Here it is after splitting it into breasts (skin-on), breast tenders, leg/thigh quarters, wings, carcass, and remaining bits.

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Vacuum sealed and froze the chicken breast tenders (2.8 oz.) for a meal like chicken paprika or fried chicken fingers or boneless 'wings'.

Vacuum marinated the 2 leg and thigh quarters in Brooks chicken marinade for barbecued chicken, 2 more dinner servings.

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The barbecued chicken marinated overnight, then I grilled it for 6 minutes. It's not fully cooked through to it has to go into the sous vide for 45 minutes at 160°F. Vacuum sealed, one serving frozen.

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Seasoned the breasts with salt, freshly ground black pepper, garlic powder and rubbed sage. Put everything remaining into a roasting pan, roast for 30 minutes at 400°F for the breasts, and 10 more minutes for everything else.

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Here are the roasted skin-on chicken breasts. Use an instant-read thermometer to make sure they get to 160°F in the middle.

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And everything else roasted. They'll be boiled in soup, so it's not necessary to check their temperature, but after 40 minutes they'll certainly be done, anyway.

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Save the drippings from the roasting pan! Combine 12 oz. cold water and 1/8 cup of all-purpose flour. Add to the chicken pan drippings and bring almost to a boil. Cook for 5 minutes on the stove. Season with soy sauce and salt to taste. Strain. This made about 12 oz., which is perfect so each breast serving can have 6 oz. of gravy. And it was really delicious!

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After the chicken breast has been cooled, sliced and vacuum sealed. One serving is for dinner tonight, the other frozen for a future dinner, both with gravy, and about 5.0 oz. each.

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Made pressure cooker chicken soup with the roasted chicken bits, celery, carrot, onion, garlic, peppercorns, bay leaf and 48 oz. water.

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Let the cool for 15 minutes, release the pressure from the pressure cooker, then cool the pan. I usually put it in a sink partially filled with cold water, but it's 10°F outside with snow on the ground, and that works great too.

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Liquid drained off through a colander into a large measuring cup. I set it back outside to cool to make it easier to skim the fat off the top, but if it's cool enough you can use the refrigerator.

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Here are the solid bits of the stock. Putting it out a sheet pan makes it much easier to separate out the bones, fat, vegetable pieces, neck, gizzards, etc. (left) from the good meat for the soup (right).

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There was 10.5 oz. of good meat, enough for 3 servings with 3.5 oz. chicken and 16 oz. stock, a hearty bowl of soup for lunch!

Vacuum sealed and frozen.

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And served, with soba noodles and spinach.

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That works out to 5 dinners and 3 lunches, not bad for one chicken.

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Rick Kasguma published on January 14, 2015 9:55 AM.

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